rawpixel / Pixabay

Looking in on those in the signing only deaf community, I notice a lot of activism which is mostly just ill effective smoke signals back towards the crowd that’s cheering it on, which is themselves.  There’s blog post after blog post, video after video of things titled like “10” or “15 things hear people need to do” and my response?  Well no, hearing people don’t need to do anything.  They don’t really have to know anything other than whereas I’m deaf myself, I’m not culturally Deaf.  So the only thing they need to know is “I’m deaf” and “I’m a lipreader, but sometimes I can’t quite catch what you’re saying, especially if you’re relatively new to me”.

Generally, upon knowing I’m deaf, those with functioning hearing do tend to forget sometimes due to lip reading making it often appear like I’m just hard of hearing or in some cases makes them completely forget I have hearing loss at all.  Hearing folk are quite accommodating once they learn someone is deaf, in most cases.

Most people don’t have a problem turning on closed captioning when I ask, have no problem helping me at the drive thru when I’m with hearing buddies, have no problem repeating themselves in most cases.

Yes many people still say things like “I’m sorry you’re deaf” and “I don’t know how I could possibly live without my hearing”, but it’s not said in jest to us.  Those that feel sorry and explicitly state it, actually do wish us well and not meaning ill will, meaning they’re not tossing us any shade.  And those that say they can’t live without hearing, when we tell them we get by just fine in most cases by learning to adapt to the situation end up seeing us as brave and tough cookies more than pathetic wastrels.

There’s no need to get angry nor upset at the hearing and more often than not, any perceived discrimination you receive isn’t actually discrimination, just frustration with someone ignorant and nothing more.

Don’t get me wrong, discrimination does indeed happen, especially when it comes to employment hiring practices as well as instances involving servers or flight attendants (service industry).  However most of the damage done to the deaf in hiring practices revolves around those who are culturally Deaf making us all look like none of us speak, making it out that lip readers don’t exist and making us seem like we’re completely incapable when that’s not entirely the case.

Yes group meetings are difficult if not impossible, but it doesn’t mean that we can’t speak, it’s just our attention can’t easily be divided when it comes to conversations.

Those that rely only on signing instead of speaking involved in Deaf Culture are actually the cause of a great deal of the issues we deaf people face, due to the mountain of myths and misconceptions about us and it is so frustratingly difficult to dispel these myths when Deaf Culture keeps rearing it’s ugly ass head.

The hearing aren’t our enemies, they are our friends, and they truly do care for us.  At least most of them do.  There are narcissists that can’t think about anyone but themselves which is growing all to common these days and seems to get worse as the years progress.  They’re not discriminating against you for being deaf though, what’s going on is that they’re at a job and they feel they shouldn’t have to do it and hate being there.  It’s not just you that they’re shitty towards, they’re like that to the hearing as well.

geralt / Pixabay

Starting out, I’m deaf myself, just mainstreamed, raised with oralism in mind even though I was denied cochlear implants by my mother at a young age.  Not sure why she denied me getting them exactly these days, though I suppose it was due to not being expected to really live all too long due to complications.  All that aside.

Oralism started originally a very long time ago before technology like cochlear implants, heck even before most of modern medicine.  In the 1860’s USA for example, cochlear implants weren’t a thing and those who are profoundly deaf at birth would have an exceptionally difficult time learning to speak and thus have stunted educational growth.  Times like this are often referred back to by modern day deaf activists that insist that oralism is abuse (it isn’t modern day).

The problem with these activists is that it’s not the 1860’s anymore.  The original cochlear implant was invented in 1957 and the technology has only improved over time.  Zoom over to modern day and the cochlear implant technology is sufficient enough that it would blow a deaf person’s mind, not only making speech that much better than ever in history for deaf people, but overall allows for better communication and integration into mainstream society and it’s vast number of varying cultures and subcultures.

Clker-Free-Vector-Images / Pixabay

So long as the auditory nerve is still viable and healthy, and you have a proper enough ear shape that doesn’t require additional surgeries to make a proper base for it, the cochlear implant is by and large the way you should be going in order to get your life kickstarted, especially if you’re a young child.

There are absolutely zero valid arguments against the cochlear implant these days and frankly it’s absurd that people are still leaving profoundly deaf children without these crucial devices that will set their life to be easier with more rich social interactions, greatly improved accessibility and the rich sounds of the hearing world.

So far, the only argument those in Deaf Culture have left revolve entirely around is “It’ll destroy our culture”.  The reason behind this is because they require additional newly born deaf people to come into their fold and be indoctrinated into their culture via deaf schools in order to continue to perpetuate it.  If deaf children are implanted with cochlear implants and raised through oralism, or even raised without the CI and mainstreamed with oralism like myself, they are unlikely to have the ideological slant on everything that Deaf Culture relies on, which is heavily socialistic and authoritarian.

This is why mainstreamed deafs, such as myself, that hold center left, libertarian principles are rejected, outcasted and alienated by and large by those in Deaf Culture.  We can’t get involved in it even so much as to get help learning to sign, because I support the use of hearing aids and cochlear implants as well as lip reading and speaking.

Oralism has opened up my world to allow me to go someplace to eat and be able to actually order my own food verbally, to speak to the server if and when I need to.  Oralism has allowed me to be able to hold conversations with practically anyone I could randomly bump into out in public without the need of an interpreter or to have them learn to sign before hand.  Nobody has to learn an additional language for me to be able to communicate with the majority of people in my country and state.

Granted, I don’t have a cochlear implant and phone calls are still generally impossible for me without assistance, either by having someone call for me and just verbally repeating what’s said on the phone, or using a service like InnoCaption in order to have someone listen in on the call and transcribe what’s being said to me.

I generally prefer to not have to use a service like InnoCaption, but I unfortunately need to in order to make important phone calls to make doctor appointments and other important calls.  With modern cochlear implants, not only would I not really need a caption service because I’d be able to just use bluetooth to hear what’s being said, I’d have a greater feeling of independence.

So what that the technology isn’t 100% perfect and the deaf with them won’t hear exactly like a hearing person will?  At the very least it accomplishes in allowing the deaf to hear and better comprehend speech without inaccurate lip reading.  They do also allow the deaf to better enjoy the sounds of music, not just the varying vibrations.

So as I said, there are no valid arguments against oralism modern day.

thisismyurl / Pixabay

When it comes to hearing loss, especially deafness, speech can become heavily affected. I try to speak where I can even though it is quite exhausting to think of my words before I say them, and to then also have to focus on what the other person is saying while lip reading them. It takes effort and time (and years of speech therapy) but I did learn to speak so that I don’t sound deaf (deaf accent).

We tend to concentrate on the ears rather than our speech but we need to be able to respond as well as hear. Use your speech or freakin’ lose it, seriously.

I’ve been deaf for a long time, and I’ve had to learn the cadence of regular speech, other deaf people aren’t as lucky and have a monotonous voice. Deafness will cause speech lose if you’re not mindful of it and use your voice regularly in both adults and kids.

Deaf people claim they don’t need to use their voice because we have sign language but they’re neglecting their speech which is a vital aspect in communication that will lessen our dependency on others. Yes it’s easier to not attempt lip reading, but why cut off accessibility to yourself and force yourself to have to rely on others to communicate? Sure it’s easier to avoid the stress and I admit I even go mute when in stores by myself because it’s easier just to do that, but should I really be doing that? Not really.

Not to demean sign language usage, but culturally, with Deaf Culture, to cut off accessibility to yourself because you refuse to speak using your voice just seems absurdly bizarre to me. Why make life harder on yourself? My speech usage means I don’t have to rely on it so heavily myself even when surrounded by hearing folk who can’t or don’t know how to sign or are unwilling or unable to learn it.

Is communication signing easier? Of course it is. It’s easier for me to see movements as gestures that mean something that often subtle or inperceiveable lip movements in order to figure out what someone is saying with or without residual hearing. But it’s also harder to communicate with people in a world of noise with people who do hear, when you yourself refuse to make effort to communicate effectively with them as well.

johnhain / Pixabay

I have a message for the Deaf Culture part of the deaf community, the perpetually offended minority of the deaf community, the 20% of the deaf community that attempts to speak for all deaf and hard of hearing alike. You don’t speak for all deaf people and you certainly as hell don’t speak for nor care for the hard of hearing, so please do everyone a favor and admit that you’re just selfish pricks looking for more benefits solely for yourself regardless if it hurts others or not.

You advocate for the hard of hearing by telling them, “Oh we are here for you” and then you start pushing ASL on them as if that’s going to help them any. Know what would actually help the hard of hearing, who are generally involved in a culture far away from deaf culture? Things like hearing aids. You know those things that some people like myself wear? Yeah, those things.

Know what doesn’t help them? ASL.

Why does hearing aids help them? Because being hard of hearing implies that they have enough hearing ability that a hearing aid will give them a greatly improved quality of life and still be able to navigate and participate in the mainstream cultures at large involving the hearing.

Know why ASL doesn’t help them? Because most of them already have a culture they’re a part of and that involves being around the hearing for a large degree of their lives. So them knowing ASL isn’t going to help them any if nobody around them knows ASL.

The arguement against my argument here is that the hard of hearing knowing ASL can participate in deaf culture. Well, I would buy into your argument and concede my own, if that were actually true. You see, I’m deaf and even I get run off from mingling among deaf culture, and I’m seriously fucking deaf.

You’re so paranoid and uptight about protecting “muh culture” from outsiders that you perceive everything, even a minor question, as an attack for being culturally insensitive by people who know nothing about your culture because low and behold they’re not a part of the culture and are trying to be.

You seriously run a hell of a lot of people off. You guys ran me off and I’m deaf too, and the Hard of Hearing get the same kind of treatment I got the several times I’ve attempted. You refuse to kick the toxic people out of your groups and you all seem to congregate to every group. I’m not kidding, I went to a deaf meetup and two people were being complete asses and it’s sign language, you can clearly see the person being a cunt, especially when others are paying attention to the new guy.

I’m like alright, well I’m not going to that one ever again, those guys were complete assholes treating me like shit. So I go to another one two cities over, a one hour drive to get there and what do I see? Mostly all the same people including the two assholes as before and nobody bothered to kick those toxic pricks out.

Welcoming and inclusive my ass. Oh that deaf person lip reads, therefore he’s an outsider. The Hard of Hearing get the same thing, “Oh he can hear, he’s hard of hearing, he’s not one of us, he’s an outsider” and you treat them like complete shit too and the people that treat him like shit? Nothing happens to them, they’re not kicked from the group, they’re not chasticed by the group, nothing.

Don’t believe me? Then how come discussion topics started by the hard of hearing are too commonly started like Reddit user heheikb689 on the /r/deaf subreddit who says the following.

Title: Is it just me or do Deaf people dislike hard of hearing people more than hearing people?

I’ve tried learning sign language and getting involved in Deaf culture as someone who became hard of hearing in their early teens, but every time I end up feeling more excluded than when I’m around hearing people. If I try using broken sign language, people just laugh at me or roll their eyes. If I ask someone to slow down their signing I get treated similarly. This has never happened to me when trying to learn a new oral language, where people are willing to slow down and help you (unless they’re xenophobic or something). Yet when you see a hearing person learning sign language they are lionized and treated well by the group.

I feel like there should be solidarity between our two communities as we both face exclusion and isolation from the structurally hearing world but I honestly feel lonelier around Deaf people than around many hearing people, who take my struggles with my self-perception/language as existential quirks rather than existential failures (yes, Deaf people seem to assume you’re a failure if you can’t sign and if you feel a shame over your hearing loss).

Anyways before you attack my generalizing please give me good examples where HOH people, especially adult HOH were helped by the Deaf community? I’m feeling like I should give up on my disability activism sometimes…

End quote.

You think he’s alone?

Reddit user Psychoticdream responds to question and statement quoted just a moment ago.

Quote: nope it’s something that actually happens. as a HoH guy my sign language is bad, some deaf people are patient, others treat you like they treat foreigners who don’t know the local language. with derison.

it happens. most people are nice and will slow down or correct you but there’s usually a few more that will look down on you like some kind of peasant.

HoH people tend to be the outcasts of the hearing world, and the outcasts of the deaf community. it happens, you might get luckier than most of us though..
Annnd unquote

And there’s more

ladyMmJay says “I hate the clique mentality. It’s so childish. Regardless of our hearing abilities or non hearing abilities we are all people. I really wish the deaf community was more welcoming.”

inkathebadger says about his deaf or near deaf wife, “Are you my wife? She’s basically one step away from needing and implant has hearing aids and is speaking deaf, and was transferred to a school when she was younger so she could better learn sign and so on and basically hated the whole time she was there because the fully deaf and BSL fluent seemed to hate her guts.

Whenever I mention us taking an ASL course (cause we in Canada now) or checking out local deaf/HOH groups she looks like she’s gunna have a panic attack because of those bad years.”

Geddyn says, “I have worn hearing aids since I was three. I never learned sign language when I was young and have made multiple efforts to integrate with the deaf community as an adult, but my experience has been the same as yours each time.

As a result, I no longer even bother to attempt to learn ASL, nor do I make any effort to interact with the deaf community.”

There’s so many hard of hearing and even deaf people who’ve attempted and attempted and attempted some more only to be treated with hostility and contempt. To be run off like Frankensteins Monster by a mob of uncaring jackasses.

You want to help the hard of hearing and the vast majority of deaf people (the whole whopping 80% of the deaf population that aren’t in deaf culture)? How about you stop soaking up all the god damn resources for your pathetic, selfish bullshit and stop demonizing everyone that wants to correct their hearing and improve their life. Stop diverting funds towards deaf clubs and meetups from government funding and instead allow them to be used for improved English literacy, ASL classes, speech therapy, hearing aids and cochlear implants and audiology appointments.

And stop telling government officials that it’s “culturally offensive” because all you’re doing is hurting other deaf people and the hard of hearing in the process while claiming to be in support of them and claiming to be welcoming and inclusive when you’re clearly not.

You’re selfish idiots content with your velvety prison of reliance on everyone around you. You’re happy being deaf, great, a lot of us, myself included, aren’t happy being deaf. And you can claim “Well just learn ASL and be a part of our community” all you want, but unless you kick out and ostracize those toxic people from your groups and ban them from participating, you’re not going to be able to welcome the people that want to participate.

I wanted to participate before, but I’ve stopped trying, because of the hostile treatment I received. And the hard of hearing have the same kind of experience I had involving their attempts as well.

Stop misinforming people and stop lying. You don’t care about the hard of hearing and you don’t care about other deaf people and you’re not welcoming, you’re not inclusive. You’re unwelcoming and hostile, and furthermore you’re exclusionary by your very nature and very isolationist. I much prefer to be in the company of the hearing and hard of hearing than other deaf people much of the time because even though I’m deaf myself, Deaf Culture having cultists have made me see people with my own disability that don’t speak in a very negative light.

So now the ball is in your court. Fix your community, kick out the toxic people, and ban them. And I’m not done with Deaf Culture yet, not by a long shot, I now have 12 scripts to read through as of writing this so I have a massive bone to pick.

geralt / Pixabay

Hello, my name is CryptoDeaf. It’s worth noting that hearing loss when left untreated without proper care and education actually costs the American health care system far more than if they were to completely cover all audiologist visits and 100% of the cost of hearing aids and cochlear implants. It’s a falsehood to believe that denying free hearing aids and cochlear implants to those that need them will end up saving money.

The reality is, denying even hearing aids to someone just hard of hearing can cost upwards to 50 to 60 times more to the health care system than if they had just covered the hearing aids, care and education.

The lack of coverage for hearing results in most lower income people from receiving the proper hearing treatment that they need. And as I can attest to personal experience, my own hearing loss has caused tremendous amounts of depression stemming from the feeling of isolation.

Hearing aids are incorrectly listed by insurance providers as a cosmetic device when the reality is that hearing is not cosmetic but a needed thing in life. We humans are social creatures and require being able to socialize with one another in order to be happy, however you cut the hearing off then we’re going to result in having mental health issues and further down the road atrophy of the brain (dead serious too).

It’s not just about being unable to hear or hear properly. When you can’t hear, you end up with social isoation, loneliness, depression and risk of suicide. It’s high time the health care industry starts giving a damn about people with hearing loss, as it’s really not cost effective for them to deny us proper care. Oh don’t want to spend $13,000 USD for a set of high end hearing aids with all the bells and whistles like bluetooth so we can talk on a cell phone, enjoy music and things like that and an FM transmitter to be able to better hear our party or associates in crowded spaces? Enjoy the more expensive bill of us needing mental health care, therapy, mental health medications, possibility of needing mental health intake care for the suicidal, medical issues caused by suicide attempts, etc.

What can untreated hearing loss result in?

irritability
negativism
anger
fatigue
tension
stress
depression
suicidal thoughts
avoidance
withdrawal from social situations
social rejection
loneliness
reduced alertness
risk to personal safety
impaired memory
disability in learning new tasks
reduced job performance / earning capbility
diminished psychological health
diminished cognitive function
higher risk of dementia
reduced vocabulary
paranoia
increased risk of alzheimers disease
increased risk to safety (not being able to hear potential intruders, call 911 or other emergency services for help when needed, etc)

It’s a lot like sitting and watching the game of life but never being able to play yourself.

And worse if I’m by myself and break my legs or back falling down the stairs, how the hell do I place a phone call to get help? If someone is breaking into my home to harm me and I’m alone, how do I get help? The best I can currently do if hurt is to say “I’m deaf I need paramedics to address here” repeatedly until they hang up and wait and hope they got the message and got my address correct.

And yes that’s scenario that’s actually happened to me before and I know I’m not alone in that regard.

It’s cheaper to just give me the fucking hearing aids or CI without cost to me, than it is to treat all this extra bullshit that comes with leaving hearing loss untreated.

clemtheriez / Pixabay

I really dislike it when people keep coming up with new terms that are supposed to be “offensive” or to mitigate offence. Especially in the deaf community. The terms diabled or hearing impaired are considered offensive today whereas when I was growing up, hearing impaired and hearing disabled were politically correct and nicer things to say than deaf.

Truth of the matter is, I get deaf people from time to time telling me how it’s offensive that I talk about deafness as a form of a disability rather than as a culture, but that’s the thing, I was born hard of hearing and was mainstreamed since. And yes I can sign and learning ASL, it doesn’t mean I’m any less disabled than before. I’m not entrenched in deaf culture, I’m mainstreamed. I’ve never been a part of Deaf Culture and honestly every time I’ve tried I’ve felt alienated because of the cult like mentality of it.

When speaking of deafness as a disability, I’m able to discuss the needs of the deaf for accessibility and talk about the challenges we face in a hearing world, this allows me to get mutual respect, understanding and acceptance and overall makes my life easier. Even going as far as describing deaf with the lowercase D versus Deaf with an uppercase D is quite confusing for the hearing. And honestly calling deafness a culture also doesn’t help us nor do us any favors.

But in order for the hearing to be able to give us the support we want and need, they have to be able to call it something, and getting butthurt about the name isn’t going to help us any. Fuck your feelings and get over it. Culture isn’t a need, it’s merely a preference. Support however is a need, but your culture? Doesn’t require support.

Think about it, how often is “deaf” touched on in regards to discussions about the disabled? It’s because most disability groups and networks have lost interest in us in large part due to Deaf Culture cultists that have constantly nagged them to death that we’re not disabled and it’s our culture blah blah blah which ends up hurting folks like myself in the end. Because low and behold guess what nimrod? Maybe you don’t actually speak for everyone that’s deaf! *Le gasp* could it be we deaf people aren’t a fucking hive mind and have individual needs and preferences and opinions and ideas and thoughts and cultures and all that?

We’re deaf, and yes we’re disabled. If we weren’t disabled then how come we use the ever living hell out of disability payments, welfare and various other forms of support compared against say, an amputee?

When another deaf person is talking about deafness as a disability, maybe instead of trying to speak for them and tell them how they’re wrong because muh culture, how about you let them speak for themselves because they have a different experience in life than you. You need to face the facts that some of us lost our hearing later in life, and some of us weren’t as privileged as you to be raised signing and chest deep in a culture geared entirely around the disability.

What’s the term feminists use a lot? Oh, right. Check your privilege. Some of us, myself included, would give our left nut to hear properly. I don’t give two shits if you think it’s not a disbability and I don’t give two fucks if you think deaf culture is beautiful and glorious and believe (wrongly) that we can do it all. You’re happy being deaf? Great, I’m glad for you, but I’m not happy being deaf and there isn’t anything you can tell me that’s going to change that fact.

You apparently don’t have to deal with missing sound, you don’t have to deal with not actually hearing music but rather just enjoy feeling it and being fine with that. You don’t have to deal with wanting to hold conversations with someone you really love because your partner probably signs. You probably don’t have that intense feeling of isolation and non-stop depression and constant thoughts of suicide because of how difficult it is to have long and meaningful conversations.

We get it, your life is rosey. Congrats. A lot of us weren’t dealt that hand in life and are unhappy and consider deafness a disability. I’m deaf, and I consider being deaf a disability, because it is. If you think otherwise, you’re welcome to buzz off and take that deaf culture bullcrap with you, I’ll have none of that stuck up, cultist like crap. And if deafness isn’t a disability, you’re welcome to stop receiving disability payments, jackass.

geralt / Pixabay

DLive.io, wonderful little streaming platform, and honestly I got to say that I enjoy using them in order to do my livestreams and uploading videos.  I think it certainly beats YouTube considering their latest fiasco, among other social media sites also participating in the same form of blatant censorship.  However I was on BitChute prior to this as well and I’ve noticed a striking issue with even that particular site, in that much of my livestreams where I’m doing a long let’s play, just won’t upload, maybe it has something to do with the filesize.  Small videos are fine, big ones are not it seems.  Minds, well they have an issue involving a 15 minute time limit on videos so that also doesn’t work.

You can follow me on DLive as the username @outtheshellvlog for those interested.

However when it comes to watching content on DLive, it’s generally the livestreams themselves that are more accessible than the videos.  Most content creators aren’t going to close caption their videos, even on YouTube and the autocaptions on YouTube are garbage. If you think they’re fine, go to a video and mute it and just use the autocaptions and see if you can follow along with WTF is going on.

However, even though playback content isn’t very accessible, the streamers themselves seem to be more than happy to make it accessible during their livestream.  Not all of them are going to be willing to do this of course, but I’ve had several so far being more than willing to pause the game and actually type in their chat when they wanted to respond to something I said or wanting to take a smoke break and chat with me for a moment, which I thought was exceptionally cool.

So DLive itself, and Minds… and BitChute, and tons of other video services, including yes even Twitch, are inaccessible for the deaf when it comes to video content.  The key difference is in people willing to take the time to chat with you in the live chat, or in some cases (depending on context) willing to type out a briefing of what was said in a video.  And so far, on Minds and DLive, the people have been more than willing to help out and they’ve all been super lovely about it.

johnhain / Pixabay

It’s no surprise that that there are abusers out in the world, and there are those that are abused.  It’s an unfortunate state of affairs when a hearing person results in abusing a deaf person who already struggles excessively in life, far more than the average joe blow.  A deaf person already faces discrimination and hostility from the hearing world at large from a variety of sources for a variety of reasons, from something minor like getting irritated with our communication needs when it’s so super easy for the hearing person to just speak and hating having to write something down for us all the way to the extreme of constant online bullying and harassment to being beaten by our family or partners.

Many of us mainstreamed deafs turn to the internet as a way of dealing with our depression that stems from the feeling of isolation.  This feeling of isolation comes from the inability for us to be able to properly communicate with someone face to face, at least not easily.

To be even in a one on one conversation, lip reading and using what residual hearing we have left, if we have any at all, is not only challenging, but also mentally exhausting.  But when it comes to group settings, the cards are just not in our favor, conversations end up going on and we’re left in the dust unable to keep up.

This is why the internet is so important to mainstreamed deafs overall.  It allows us some semblance of having some form of normalcy as a way of being able to actually participate.  It’s nowhere near as good as the real thing in person, that’s a given, but it’s definitely helpful and at least it’s something.

The biggest issue involving dealing with the internet, however, tend to be those who claim to know what it’s like to experience cyber bullying, they claim to be against bullying, against harassment, against stalking, against making someone into a victim.  They decry abuse, unfortunately a lot of these very same people are more than willing to dish out the abuse they so claim to be against.

These kinds of people will claim to even be advocates of the disabled, but at a moment’s turn, they reveal themselves to be a venomous snake that was doing nothing more than awaiting your trust so your guard will be down, and once that guard is down, BOOM they strike.

Granted not everyone is like that, not by a long shot, but online abuse has made me exceptionally weary of people who don’t share my disability.  If they’re not at least moderately hard of hearing, I tend to be exceptionally more cautious around them, even more so if they’re hearing.

I’m even leery of people that share my sexuality on account that they too will turn on you.  No community is perfect, not by a long shot, but it is a rather sad state of affairs when the disabled are abused.  Unfortunately the people that do the abuse, don’t tend to believe they’re doing any abuse.

GDJ / Pixabay

A total immersion approach to BSL is the answer? Some facts BSL campaigners distort when talking about educational approaches. E.G.
‘Facts and figures.’ (Source the BBC).

(1) There are about 11 million people in the UK who are deaf or hard of hearing.

I believe ATR gave the best response to this section on his blog on blogspot whos blog post in particular I’m utilizing from his picked sections of the source to rebut with also my own arguments.  His response to it is below.

[Never validated. No statistical analysis has ever been done, that defines loss, it is impossible and falls foul of the Data protection law, and is cross-related to disability stats, the majority of ‘deaf’ stats tend to only emerge from deaf charity bases (So with obvious bias), who don’t have resources to validate, but are USED as valid resources because the system doesn’t know either. AOHL puts the figures at 9m, including 3m who never use a hearing aid. BDA stats have doubled year on year without any validity, to currently  over 90,000 deaf signers, 6 times an increase from 15,000 who stated in a national census of actual use and twice the number registered by health systems, such stats are  unquotable as accurate.]

This is all to unfortunately done in the United States as well, often times inflating the number of deaf and it’s need for ASL by including even people who don’t rely on signing at all either because of residual hearing with lip reading or due to cochlear implants which I’ve spoken about before on how it’s not really child abuse to give your child the CI but it is child abuse to not give them it.

Those involved in Deaf Culture have a vested interest in making their small minority appear much larger than it really is in order to obtain special funding and services for themselves out of fear of their culture of heavy reliance on disability finances, interpreters and the like dying out, which is should.  Deaf culture is a parasitic culture and it’s overall attitude is quite toxic.  Due to being toxic enough to run most deaf and hard of hearing people out, they have to inflate their numbers in order to continue to seem relevant, but reality is they’re just like dinosaur media trying to cling desperately to legacy models instead of adapting to the times.

(2) There are more than 48,000 deaf children in the UK – 41,261 in England, 2,374 in Wales, 2,942 in Scotland and 1,497 in Northern Ireland.

Like before, it is automatically assuming everyone that is deaf signs, which is clearly not the case.  While I can sign, I largely prefer not to, especially not with ASL nor BSL as I see them both as vastly inferior languages.  The reason I see them that way is because it’s language syntax and structure feels like it was created by a bunch of uneducated children, then I actually researched things further and found out that it was created by a bunch of uneducated children.  Go figure.  No wonder it’s inferior to Signed English.

So why don’t deafs like myself sign?  Because I’m very accustomed to using English and like I said, ASL and BSL both are inferior.  So since if I’m going to sign I’ll be using Signed English and no interpreter knows Signed English, it’s pointless for me to bother with it so therefore, I stick with oralism, which is the way of the future anyway.  It’s incorrect to assume that just because they’re deaf, they must also be sign users.

(3) BSL is the first or preferred language of about 70,000 deaf people in the UK.

Another inflated number, again this is also done heavily in the United States in which even ASL interpreters are added into the number of “deaf” even though they’re clearing regular hearing folk that just happen to also have an education in sign language.  Much of the times these stats get inflated further by adding in people who are moderately to profoundly hard of hearing just to make the number larger.

This is no different than making a new word like “Femicide” and defining it as “When a woman is killed because she is a woman usually by a man” and then throwing in the list of victims of “femicide” who are both male and female children and grown men who were killed by their mothers/wife.  I’ve actually seen this, it’s quite sad people lie in order to inflate numbers so severely, but if they have an agenda to push, no lie is too great and no one particular group is too hearing to be lumped in with the number of deaf in statistics.

Sign language has no written component. Deaf people can only use sign language to communicate face to face.

As ATR Said [WITH each other, and not with others without support elsewhere, so not enabling deaf people to cope in a hearing world, and inhibiting deaf children’s opportunity, and ability to be included.] This is why I consider it child abuse to not give your deaf child a cochlear implant.  Disregard what culturally deaf people have to say in the matter, they’re literally wanting to stunt your kids future for the sake of keeping their parasitic and toxic culture alive.  (hurr isn’t that hate speech against the deaf?) I am deaf numb nuts!  I’ve been deaf since I was a small child.

This means that the deaf must use English or another language for reading and writing, which has become increasingly important for business and communication with the advent of computers and the Internet.

It’s not that it’s increasingly important, it’s that it’s absolutely required.  If you can’t communicate verbally, lip read, etc, and you aren’t literate in English, there isn’t a prayer’s chance in fictional hell that you’ll be able to make it in the real world and will have to rely on a parasitic culture in order to get by, meaning you’ll have to pass up on millions of cultures in favor of a really terrible one without a choice in the matter.  IN order to mingle with people of other cultures, you’re sadly going to have to use an interpreter when you could’ve just learned English and gotten a CI and learn to speak and listen and be set out on your own without reliance on others and be part of a multitude of beautiful cultures.

Can’t read English in an English speaking country? Your educated is stunted, you’re ability to learn new tasks is excessively hindered and you’re not able to properly accomplish tasks in the mainstream job market.  This is a simple fact.

Deaf children who are given cochlear implants at a young age, learn to speak and go through mainstream education have a statistical IQ average between 95-110, roughly on par with their hearing peers.  Deaf children aren’t given cochlear implants at a young age and are instead sent through a Deaf School have a statistical IQ average between 65-78.

Psychological studies as referenced via Jordan Peterson in his lecture about IQ and job abilities show the lower the IQ of an individual, the less likely they are to be able to produce meaningful and fulfilling employment and have extreme difficulty in learning new tasks.

All deaf people are bilingual IF they use sign language in addition to lip-reading.

As I stated earlier, I was born profoundly hard of hearing and been deaf since I was 10.  I speak English, Spanish and some German as verbal languages but I’m illiterate in both Spanish and German.  I also can sign but have a strong preference against using it.  But that’s not what’s being references from the article.  Hm.  It’s almost like they’re trying to pass off as being able to lip read some as being bilingual, which isn’t the case at all.  That’s like saying “Oh yeah I’m bilingual because I can speak English and I know a few phrases in German but can’t really pronounce them well.”  So the people they’re referencing in the BBC article are still very sign dependant.

As with any second language, sign language has its own unique history, culture and grammatical structure, making the translation from signing to writing in standard English a significant challenge.

This sounds more like an argument against the likes of ASL and BSL and a strong argument for Signed English instead.  Unfortunately in deaf schools the children are taught using inferior language that’s going to confuse them when they try learning English and have an ass backwards structure of sentencing and syntax that it ends up literally stunting their educational growth, probably why their average IQ is much lower than mainstreamed deafs who don’t learn sign until much later in life.

Deaf Schools aren’t teaching children well enough due to the use of ASL or BSL instead of the better Signed English resulting in them being unable to really properly integrate into the mainstream society and necessitates that they isolate themselves in a cultural bubble due to being unable to cope with the world at large.  As ATR puts it on his blog. “Would you teach your child to speak French if he lived in Germany, assuming the interpreters will just provide the rest?”  Or as I’ll reword it “Would you live in America with your American baby and only teach the child to speak Japanese and assume he’ll be just fine?”

Sign language requires the use of hands to make gestures.

Uh…. duh.  Nah, this whole time everyone in the world thought sign language was a series of clicks of the tongue and eye blinks. Hurr.

This can be a problem for people who do not have full use of their hands. Even seemingly manageable disabilities such as Parkinson’s or arthritis can be a major problem for people who must communicate using sign language. Having a broken arm or carrying a bag of groceries can, for a deaf person, limit communication. The amount of light in a room also affects the ability to communicate using sign language.

Mhm, wouldn’t it be better to have a cochlear implant so you can avoid signing with arthritis or parkinsons and be able to communicate with people in the dark?  Don’t know about you but I would kinda prefer to be able to have a meaningful conversation with someone on a long road trip and not have to have them take their hands off the wheel, turn on the car’s interior lights in the middle of the night of the long journey just to sign something to me.  Soooooo they just made the argument for why oralism is superior and why deaf people really should be getting cochlear implants if and when we can.

I don’t think that was their intention, but it’s certainly the message they ended up providing.

[BBC Source] [ATR Source]

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSo5v5t4OQM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjs2gPa5sD0
clemtheriez / Pixabay

This is a common thing parents of a child that’s born deaf ends up going through.  Do they get the child a cochlear implant or do they forgo that in favor of sending the kid to a deaf school and being part of Deaf Culture?  The culturally deaf (Deaf) will insist that giving the child a cochlear implant implies that the kid has a disability and equate it to child abuse, but is it?

But getting a CI for a child is like getting them circumsized!  It’s wrong without their educated consent!

I’ve even seen this thrown around in regards to equating giving the child a cochlear implant the same as circumcising a male infant before he can consent to it and thus removing him of bodily integrity at a young age.

However, that’s a false equivalence.  When it comes to the mutilation of the child’s genitalia (Let’s call it what it really is, male genital mutilation), there’s no real medical benefits to chopping off a child’s foreskin after he’s born.  The number of boys that grow up resulting in phimosis is quite low and easily treated with a steroidal cream and has several treatment options available to them.

Well it at least helps prevent the spread of HIV right?

There’s also no viable study that’s worth it’s salt in regards to preventing STDs and the like.  The studies on HIV prevention were bad studies on account that they studied two groups of ment, one cut (freshly done) and one uncut and tested them before and after a 6 week period… you know, the time period when the willy is still sore and sensitive from a wound.  Not going to have much sex like that so of course they contracted HIV at a far, far lower rate. DUH!

Oh but male genital mutilation reduces the risk of penile cancer!

Yeah, and chopping off your arms and legs also reduces your risk of skin cancer.  Be my guest and lop them right off to prove the point, I’ll wait.

Ok, fine, but the CI doesn’t have any medical benefit either!

This is where you’re clearly and horrifically wrong.  If your child is missing a leg due to a defect, the child is given a prosthetic limb to aid the child in learning to walk.  If the child is missing an arm he is given a prosthetic arm at a young age and learns to effectively use it well.  If the child is missing their hearing, they are given a CI so they can grow up having an easier time hearing and learning verbal communication.  It’s in the child’s best interests to have the CI so they can learn to verbally communicate with people.

What about learning deaf culture?

Deaf culture is a very small minority among the deaf.  Only 20% of the deaf population are involved in it.  Deaf culture is entirely geared around just being deaf where the only people they can effectively communicate with are other deaf people who also sign, they also heavily rely on interpreters to be able to make it out in the real world away from their isolated culture and there aren’t infinite amount of interpreters to go around either, there’s actually a major shortage of interpreters with a far too high demand as it is.

Deaf culture isn’t all that great, I’m deaf myself and believe me when I say, been there, done that, and quite frankly found it to be quite toxic personally.

But deaf culture is beautiful and unique.

Not really unique, there are other cultures that also heavily rely on other people.  Did you know there’s also a blind culture?  There’s even an amputee culture.  Blind culture even has very similar cultural trends .  Instead of signing, they read, oddly enough.  Braille, fantastic invention, but the culture geared around it is almost exactly the same as deaf culture, the main difference is it relies less heavily on other people.

People are instantly thinking “Oh this culture is so beautiful” so are the thousands of cultures that the hearing partake it and you’re seriously considering restricting your child away from all those numerous cultures to isolate them and doom them into a single culture because of their disability?  Now THAT is child abuse.

The child won’t be better off with the cochlear implants though

Yeah they will, by leaps and bounds actually.  A deaf child without a cochlear implant going through a deaf school has lower reading, mathematical and social skills than someone hearing in a regular mainstream education.  This is also true when comparing deaf in deaf schools VS deaf in mainstreamed schools with and without the CI.

Then there’s the future prospects of the child.  Do you have any idea how excessively difficult it is for a deaf person to find a job even when a company is hurting for help?  I use hearing aids and lip read because I have residual hearing and can usually get away with that very well to the point one on one a person won’t even realize I’m deaf, though may be a bit creeped out by my stare to lip read.

Being a very well spoken, oral, lip reading deaf person, I literally have employers that refuse to hire me because of my disability.  I’ve had one hiring manager tell me it would be a different story “if I had that implant thing”.  Deaf adults with a cochlear implant are are more likely to obtain gainful educations and gainful employment both than deaf people without the cochlear implants.

Deaf people with cochlear implants have a better time adapting to various social settings and adopting varying cultures, end up with a variety of friends with differing opinions, cultures, ethnicities, tastes, etc all banded together through a common language, as opposed to deaf culture which is isolated with it’s own language and not able to cross cultures due to a language barrier.

Your child will literally be better off significantly in every possible aspect.  Your child doesn’t need deaf culture.  Your child doesn’t need sign language.  Your child needs a cochlear implant.  It’s not child abuse to let your kid have the gift of a brighter and better future.  What is abuse, is restricting your child’s options and crippling his future.