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A total immersion approach to BSL is the answer? Some facts BSL campaigners distort when talking about educational approaches. E.G.
‘Facts and figures.’ (Source the BBC).

(1) There are about 11 million people in the UK who are deaf or hard of hearing.

I believe ATR gave the best response to this section on his blog on blogspot whos blog post in particular I’m utilizing from his picked sections of the source to rebut with also my own arguments.  His response to it is below.

[Never validated. No statistical analysis has ever been done, that defines loss, it is impossible and falls foul of the Data protection law, and is cross-related to disability stats, the majority of ‘deaf’ stats tend to only emerge from deaf charity bases (So with obvious bias), who don’t have resources to validate, but are USED as valid resources because the system doesn’t know either. AOHL puts the figures at 9m, including 3m who never use a hearing aid. BDA stats have doubled year on year without any validity, to currently  over 90,000 deaf signers, 6 times an increase from 15,000 who stated in a national census of actual use and twice the number registered by health systems, such stats are  unquotable as accurate.]

This is all to unfortunately done in the United States as well, often times inflating the number of deaf and it’s need for ASL by including even people who don’t rely on signing at all either because of residual hearing with lip reading or due to cochlear implants which I’ve spoken about before on how it’s not really child abuse to give your child the CI but it is child abuse to not give them it.

Those involved in Deaf Culture have a vested interest in making their small minority appear much larger than it really is in order to obtain special funding and services for themselves out of fear of their culture of heavy reliance on disability finances, interpreters and the like dying out, which is should.  Deaf culture is a parasitic culture and it’s overall attitude is quite toxic.  Due to being toxic enough to run most deaf and hard of hearing people out, they have to inflate their numbers in order to continue to seem relevant, but reality is they’re just like dinosaur media trying to cling desperately to legacy models instead of adapting to the times.

(2) There are more than 48,000 deaf children in the UK – 41,261 in England, 2,374 in Wales, 2,942 in Scotland and 1,497 in Northern Ireland.

Like before, it is automatically assuming everyone that is deaf signs, which is clearly not the case.  While I can sign, I largely prefer not to, especially not with ASL nor BSL as I see them both as vastly inferior languages.  The reason I see them that way is because it’s language syntax and structure feels like it was created by a bunch of uneducated children, then I actually researched things further and found out that it was created by a bunch of uneducated children.  Go figure.  No wonder it’s inferior to Signed English.

So why don’t deafs like myself sign?  Because I’m very accustomed to using English and like I said, ASL and BSL both are inferior.  So since if I’m going to sign I’ll be using Signed English and no interpreter knows Signed English, it’s pointless for me to bother with it so therefore, I stick with oralism, which is the way of the future anyway.  It’s incorrect to assume that just because they’re deaf, they must also be sign users.

(3) BSL is the first or preferred language of about 70,000 deaf people in the UK.

Another inflated number, again this is also done heavily in the United States in which even ASL interpreters are added into the number of “deaf” even though they’re clearing regular hearing folk that just happen to also have an education in sign language.  Much of the times these stats get inflated further by adding in people who are moderately to profoundly hard of hearing just to make the number larger.

This is no different than making a new word like “Femicide” and defining it as “When a woman is killed because she is a woman usually by a man” and then throwing in the list of victims of “femicide” who are both male and female children and grown men who were killed by their mothers/wife.  I’ve actually seen this, it’s quite sad people lie in order to inflate numbers so severely, but if they have an agenda to push, no lie is too great and no one particular group is too hearing to be lumped in with the number of deaf in statistics.

Sign language has no written component. Deaf people can only use sign language to communicate face to face.

As ATR Said [WITH each other, and not with others without support elsewhere, so not enabling deaf people to cope in a hearing world, and inhibiting deaf children’s opportunity, and ability to be included.] This is why I consider it child abuse to not give your deaf child a cochlear implant.  Disregard what culturally deaf people have to say in the matter, they’re literally wanting to stunt your kids future for the sake of keeping their parasitic and toxic culture alive.  (hurr isn’t that hate speech against the deaf?) I am deaf numb nuts!  I’ve been deaf since I was a small child.

This means that the deaf must use English or another language for reading and writing, which has become increasingly important for business and communication with the advent of computers and the Internet.

It’s not that it’s increasingly important, it’s that it’s absolutely required.  If you can’t communicate verbally, lip read, etc, and you aren’t literate in English, there isn’t a prayer’s chance in fictional hell that you’ll be able to make it in the real world and will have to rely on a parasitic culture in order to get by, meaning you’ll have to pass up on millions of cultures in favor of a really terrible one without a choice in the matter.  IN order to mingle with people of other cultures, you’re sadly going to have to use an interpreter when you could’ve just learned English and gotten a CI and learn to speak and listen and be set out on your own without reliance on others and be part of a multitude of beautiful cultures.

Can’t read English in an English speaking country? Your educated is stunted, you’re ability to learn new tasks is excessively hindered and you’re not able to properly accomplish tasks in the mainstream job market.  This is a simple fact.

Deaf children who are given cochlear implants at a young age, learn to speak and go through mainstream education have a statistical IQ average between 95-110, roughly on par with their hearing peers.  Deaf children aren’t given cochlear implants at a young age and are instead sent through a Deaf School have a statistical IQ average between 65-78.

Psychological studies as referenced via Jordan Peterson in his lecture about IQ and job abilities show the lower the IQ of an individual, the less likely they are to be able to produce meaningful and fulfilling employment and have extreme difficulty in learning new tasks.

All deaf people are bilingual IF they use sign language in addition to lip-reading.

As I stated earlier, I was born profoundly hard of hearing and been deaf since I was 10.  I speak English, Spanish and some German as verbal languages but I’m illiterate in both Spanish and German.  I also can sign but have a strong preference against using it.  But that’s not what’s being references from the article.  Hm.  It’s almost like they’re trying to pass off as being able to lip read some as being bilingual, which isn’t the case at all.  That’s like saying “Oh yeah I’m bilingual because I can speak English and I know a few phrases in German but can’t really pronounce them well.”  So the people they’re referencing in the BBC article are still very sign dependant.

As with any second language, sign language has its own unique history, culture and grammatical structure, making the translation from signing to writing in standard English a significant challenge.

This sounds more like an argument against the likes of ASL and BSL and a strong argument for Signed English instead.  Unfortunately in deaf schools the children are taught using inferior language that’s going to confuse them when they try learning English and have an ass backwards structure of sentencing and syntax that it ends up literally stunting their educational growth, probably why their average IQ is much lower than mainstreamed deafs who don’t learn sign until much later in life.

Deaf Schools aren’t teaching children well enough due to the use of ASL or BSL instead of the better Signed English resulting in them being unable to really properly integrate into the mainstream society and necessitates that they isolate themselves in a cultural bubble due to being unable to cope with the world at large.  As ATR puts it on his blog. “Would you teach your child to speak French if he lived in Germany, assuming the interpreters will just provide the rest?”  Or as I’ll reword it “Would you live in America with your American baby and only teach the child to speak Japanese and assume he’ll be just fine?”

Sign language requires the use of hands to make gestures.

Uh…. duh.  Nah, this whole time everyone in the world thought sign language was a series of clicks of the tongue and eye blinks. Hurr.

This can be a problem for people who do not have full use of their hands. Even seemingly manageable disabilities such as Parkinson’s or arthritis can be a major problem for people who must communicate using sign language. Having a broken arm or carrying a bag of groceries can, for a deaf person, limit communication. The amount of light in a room also affects the ability to communicate using sign language.

Mhm, wouldn’t it be better to have a cochlear implant so you can avoid signing with arthritis or parkinsons and be able to communicate with people in the dark?  Don’t know about you but I would kinda prefer to be able to have a meaningful conversation with someone on a long road trip and not have to have them take their hands off the wheel, turn on the car’s interior lights in the middle of the night of the long journey just to sign something to me.  Soooooo they just made the argument for why oralism is superior and why deaf people really should be getting cochlear implants if and when we can.

I don’t think that was their intention, but it’s certainly the message they ended up providing.

[BBC Source] [ATR Source]

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSo5v5t4OQM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjs2gPa5sD0
Clker-Free-Vector-Images / Pixabay

The Hard of Hearing need proper advocacy when it comes to their hearing loss and their overall needs.  Far too often, the cultural deafs will insist that the Hard of Hearing are being advocated for by them, but their promoted solution more often than anything else, is learning sign language for their region, such as ASL in the USA or BSL in the UK.

What’s wrong with hard of hearing learning sign language?

There’s nothing inherently wrong with learning a new language, however the Hard of Hearing aren’t already involved in Deaf Culture, and quite frankly Deaf Culture is excessively difficult for an outsider to get into, even if that very outsider is another individual either born deaf or went deaf as a child but was mainstreamed rather than being sent through a school for the deaf.

Since the Hard of Hearing is already involved in one or more cultures from the hearing world, they tend to prefer largely to interact with the hearing world and continue to do so.  So generally, the HoH individual will not gain any significant benefit learning sign language due to most hearing people not knowing sign language themselves.

As a result, say an American HoH person does learn ASL, the only thing that opens up to them is being able to better communicate with deaf people who already sign.  Now keep in mind signing deaf are only roughly 20% of the deaf population.  Not all deaf people sign, I’m one of them.  I can sign, but I prefer not to due to culture.  So if you have deaf people who are lip readers and speaking because of our preference in culture as for who we all hang out with (friends, family, spouse, etc), how would sign language really even benefit me personally as an oralist?  Answer is that it really wouldn’t in most cases.  Same goes with the hard of hearing.

The Deaf Culture cultural clash

The exclusiveness and isolationist nature of Deaf Culture creates a cultural clash in which the mainstreamed deafs like myself, and the hard of hearing like my roommate who are already involved in one or more cultures from the hearing world in a stark contrast with how Deaf Culture is.

For example.  In the hearing world, one generally avoids being too blunt about something to the point of being rude.  For example, if we hire a painter to paint a room, and we’re not pleased with the work.  We’ll tell them something along the lines of “It’d be better off if you sanded the edges around here some and then paint back over it”.  To someone involved in Deaf Culture, this is different.  They’ll say in the same scenario for the same painter on the same wall on the same job, “This job is sloppy.  Redo it.”

There’s also the fact that within cultures of the hearing world, talk about bodily functions aren’t openly expressed such as the need to defecate, however discussions of bodily functions isn’t culturally taboo in Deaf Culture which many, including myself, are quite off put about.  A hearing child in school will walk up to a teacher and whisper “May I go to the bathroom?” so that others don’t hear the request.  The deaf child in school will simply stay where they are regardless of who’s looking at them and sign “I need to crap, right now.”

Many people involved in Deaf Culture are heavily negative towards people who don’t already sign or who aren’t already part of their culture.  Even worse is if you don’t have the “right” politics, they’ll alienate and ostracise you even further.  An example of this is for the UK, if you were in support of Brexit, they’ll kick you out of their groups and push you away.  In the USA, if you don’t think Donald Trump is “literally Hitler” and a “far right Nazi who’s hell bent on destroying America” then they also push you out of their groups to alienate, isolate and ostracize you.  You have to walk on egg shells.  And from what I’ve seen of Hard of Hearing people, they’re not some political monolith, they’re diverse in their thoughts, opinions and even their political beliefs, from some being left wing and right wing, some being authoritarian while others heavily libertarian.

But primarily in Deaf Culture, you have heavy socialist leanings because of how Deaf Culture heavily relies on disability payments and on the hearing that signs (interpreters and CODAs) and are generally accustomed to having things handed to them.

For example, I know of an instance in both Phoenix, AZ as well as in London, England in which the deaf were offered to make the decision on what to do with X amount of funds.  They were offered two choices.

  1. The funds can be used to provide sign language classes, classes to improve literacy and english comprehension, audiologist visits, hearing aids, cochlear implants and general education for taking care of your listening devices.
  2. A club space for weekly social gatherings.

Can you figure out which direction the cultural deaf went?  If you picked option #1 you’re sorely mistaken.  They picked #2.  If they had picked #1 then they’d have benefited the hard of hearing, which is partly who that funding was also supposed to benefit and would’ve greatly helped deaf people who wanted to learn to sign and have better literacy and get help with getting listening devices that they otherwise couldn’t afford.

So instead of helping out the majority of the deaf (roughly 80%) and the hard of hearing, they chose to solely think of themselves and literally have all the funding spent solely on themselves (the Culturally Deaf) as opposed to the deaf majority and the hard of hearing.

How how did a minority manage to make it’s way into making that decision for everyone else at their detriment?  Simple, they claim that offering hearing aids and CI’s and english literacy courses were “culturally offensive” and essentially used the hecklers veto in order to get option #1 removed from the table.

So you could say it’s not so much that they picked option #2, but rather, complained and whined and protested until option #1 was taken out back and shot because of their cultural sensibilities that the majority of people the funding was meant for don’t share.

So what’s the conclusion?

The culturally deaf need to leave the hard of hearing and non-culturally deaf people alone and the culturally deaf need to stop thinking solely about themselves.  They need to stop claiming to support the hard of hearing when they clearly don’t and need to stop claiming they’re helping the hard of hearing by insisting upon them learning sign language that won’t help them any.

The hard of hearing and the non-cultural deaf are in the same camp together in that we are already involved in the mainstream cultures involving the world of sound and noise and would prefer to stay in our already existing cultures we’re a part of, instead of leaving those cultures in favor of one that’s alien to our own and often clashing with our own cultural sensibilities and taboos.